Deaf Health Communication: Seek, Share and Connect
Video Transcript

"[Grey background with white letters: DEAF HEALTH COMMUNICATION: SEEK, SHARE & CONNECT.

Next scene:
On the bottom left, there is a black, blue and orange circled logo with three people lined up. White letters after the logo says: DEAF HEALTH COMMUNICATION and QUALITY OF LIFE CENTER. This logo will remain there on the very bottom left for the whole video.

On the bottom right, there is a faded black square with white letters: Poorna Kushalnagar, Ph.D., Director

An Indian woman with black hair is wearing a black shirt with a lab coat seated on a wooden bench with green plants and trees in the background.

“Hello! We at the Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center are very excited to share a film. This film will discuss two different research projects. One project focuses on deaf college students and their trends in searching, finding, and sharing information for health-related decision making. The other project focuses on a nationwide sample of deaf adults and their trends in searching for information, which source they go to first and who they share this with, and what they do with that information. We will have a lab staff who will share results from these two studies. After that, we will have deaf community members sharing their actual experiences related to searching, sharing, and connecting health information.”

Next scene:
On the bottom right, there is a faded grey square with white letters: TraciAnn Hoglind, Research Lab Staff

A Caucasian female with brown hair is wearing a blue blouse with a grey background.

“Where do deaf people look for health information? How many? We don’t know. Have you shared, posted, asked or searched for health information?”

Next scene:
A grey background with all white letters: As college students start to transition to living independently from their family, they assume responsibility for making health related decisions and maintaining good health.
Smaller font: Kushalnagar, P., Ryan, C., Smith, S., & Kushalnagar, R. (2017). Critical health literacy in American deaf college students. Health Promotion International.

Next scene:
Grey background with blue letters on the top: HINTS-ASL Survey Question #1:
White letters: Where did deaf ASL users
Blue letters: Search
White letters: for health information?
A pie chart below shows 78% of a blue colored circle, with the remaining pie in orange.
Black letters inside the blue circle: 78%, books, brochures, organization, family, friend, doctor, internet, library, magazines/newspaper, phone info.

Next scene:
The pie chart zooms smaller and into the left. A citation appears below the pie chart with white letters: Kushalnagar, P. & Kushalnagar, R. (forthcoming). Health-Related Information Seeking among Deaf Adults: Findings from the 2017 Health Information National Trends Survey in American Sign Language (HINTS-ASL).
TraciAnn appears in the middle.

“Over 500 Deaf Americans who use ASL answered questions related to searching for health information. 78% of them have searched for health information from a source. Within this subgroup, 52% went to the internet first.”

While signing, the pie chart disappears and on the right of TraciAnn signing, a bar graph appears with blue letters on the top: HINTS-ASL Survey Question #2:
White letters: Where did deaf ASL users
Blue letters: go first
White letters: for health information?
A list are shown in white letters: books, brochures, organization, family, friend, doctor
Blue letters: Internet
White letters: library, magazines, newspaper, phone info, others.
Orange bars appear in different sizes showing the amount of participants who answered they went first for health information. The most appeared for “internet.”

The bar graph disappears, and then a new infographic appears on the left with blue letters: HINTS-ASL Survey Question #3:
White letters: How many said the health information they found was too
Blue letters: hard to understand?
10 rows of icons of persons appear, with five blue rows on the top, and 5 bottom rows are white.

TraciAnn says, “Yet, 50% of the people who searched for health information from a source said the information was hard to understand and frustrating. Are they alone? No. Family and friends should connect and support each other.”

White letters pop up on the left as TraciAnn signs: Family, friends
On the right: Support

Next scene:
A grey background with blue letters: HINTS-ASL Survey Question #4:
White letters: In the last 12 months, have you used the internet to
Blue letters: share
White letters: health information on social media sites?

Next scene:
The camera moves to the right to see a Caucasian male wearing a blue shirt sitting on a wooden bench, petting a yellow Labrador service dog sitting on the ground with his right arm. The scene changes to a zoomed-up frame of the male with green plants in the background. On the bottom left, a faded grey square appears with white letters: Remy, service dog. On the bottom right, a faded grey square appears with white letters: Hayden Shock, Stage 5 kidney failure.

Hayden signs, “Hello, my name is Hayden and I want to tell you my story. Last year, I found out I had a stage 5 kidney failure. I posted and shared this news on social media. A deaf person reached out to me, saying she had the exact same disease. She shared how she felt, and I shared how I felt. This made me feel better, knowing I will be okay. She shared her experience, and it was nice knowing someone who went through the same thing. I felt relieved learning she was okay, so that meant I will be okay too. The hospital behind me provided interpreters 24/7. We sat down with the doctors and they explained everything. No information was left out. I feel healthy and am ready for a second chance at life. I am ready for a new kidney transplant soon!”

Through Hayden’s video, a screenshot of his Instagram post pops up on the left and scrolls up to show the community’s comments.

Next scene:
Grey background with white letters appears on the left: Deaf Health ASL Survey. A USA map is below it, with red dots in different locations of the country. TraciAnn appears on the right.

“For those deaf people who took our health survey, 70% used social media. In this subgroup, 50% of deaf people who used social media also shared health information.”

As TraciAnn is signing, an infographic appears on the left. Orange numbers: 70%
White letters: of deaf respondents use social media.
10 rows of persons are shown, with the top 7 rows colored orange and the bottom 3 rows colored white.
It then changes to blue numbers: 50%
White letters: of deaf respondents use social media to
Blue letters: share health information.
Of the 10 rows of persons, 5 rows are now colored blue, then 2 rows orange, then the last 3 rows are white.
A citation is below the infographic with white letters: Kushalnagar, P. & Kushalnagar, R. (forthcoming). Health-Related Information Seeking among Deaf Adults: Findings from the 2017 Health Information National Trends Survey in American Sign Language (HINTS-ASL).

Next scene:
Grey background with blue letters: HINTS-ASL Survey Question #5:
White letters: What did deaf people do to
Blue letters: look and find
White letters: information about health or medical topics from any source?

Next scene:
Grey background with TraciAnn in the middle. A white flashing light appears.

TraciAnn: “You can communicate and share information with people through FaceTime or videoconferencing.”

Three buttons show up to make it look like a FaceTime call. The left button is white with a reverse icon. The middle button is green, with a phone icon. The right button is white, with a microphone icon. TraciAnn clicks on the green icon to accept the call, which changes to the next scene.

Next scene:
An Indian female is standing on a busy sidewalk with metal fences and green trees in the background. A faded black square appears on the bottom right, with white letters: Maleni Chaitoo, Hodgkin’s lymphoma survivor.

Maleni: “Hi, my name is Maleni and I am a Hodgkin’s Lymphoma survivor. I was diagnosed 20 years ago, right after I completed my freshman year at Gallaudet University. I received chemotherapy with 12 treatments every 2 weeks from May to November. When this was completed, I had radiation therapy every day for 5 weeks. This took about 10 minutes per visit. I finished all treatments by December 31, 1997. When I was sick during that time, I had to stay at the hospital for 3 weeks. Back then, the hospital did not provide interpreters. I was young at only 20 years old. I did not know what to do, so I relied on my older sisters and mother to help interpret. Sometimes, the hospital would provide an interpreter if this happened. I did not know how to get an interpreter. Back then without the Internet, cancer information sources were not easy to access. I read articles, magazines, newspapers, and books that my sisters brought and helped explain. I used them to research and learn more about cancer. I also talked with my family, friends, and former science teachers. I was nervous, scared, emotional… I was confused. Back then, when people had cancer, they usually died. Only a few that I knew survived cancer in late 1990s. I was not sure what would happen to me. 20 years later, today, deaf people now have access to information through computer, mobile phones, and cancer survivors. People are willing to share. Hospitals now provide interpreters. People have so much more access nowadays compared to 20 years ago when I got Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Looking back, I am blessed to have made it through life.”

Next scene:
Grey background with TraciAnn on the right and a person on the left pops up. A thought cloud with a red cross appears, then a light bulb goes on above the head.

TraciAnn: “Critical health literacy is key.”

TraciAnn moves to the left, with three people appearing on the right with graduation caps. Two speaking bubbles appear on the left and right with red crosses. Then a light bulb appears in the middle.

TraciAnn: “Deaf college students who share health information with their friends show improved critical health literacy skills. Health information is not always accessible in ASL. Health videos with captions are sometimes hard to understand. What do we do about this? How do we share health information? You, your friends, family can educate each other and help share information. Post information on social media. This will help promote deaf community’s health knowledge. This can help with making health choices and decisions, knowing what they need to do to take care of their health.”

While TraciAnn is signing, she moves to the right. A person icon shows up on the left top, then three persons pop up below, then four people appear below that with a heart. Then the people turn blue from top to bottom. It changes to a light bulb on the top, with white letters: Health information. A group of 14 people are blue and smiling. It fades, then white letters show up: Decisions, choices.

TraciAnn: “Communication and sharing information is important.”

Next scene:
Grey background with blue letters: HINTS-ASL Survey Question #6:
White letters: Do you have friends or family members that you
Blue letters: discuss
White letters: with about your health?

Next scene:
A Sri Lankan male with black hair and a chin beard is wearing a grey shirt seated on a blue chair in the library with books in the background. A faded black square appears on the bottom right with white font: Sajiran Nadarajah, has family histories of diabetes & cancer. As Sajiran signs, a family tree pops up on the top left of the screen, with a few red persons, which means they are affected with diabetes or cancer.

Sajiran: “Hello, my name is Saj. I have a family history of diabetes and cancer. My grandfather passed away of cancer, so I never met him. When I was growing up, my aunt and uncle got cancer and diabetes. Both were hearing. When I asked them about this, they just said they would be fine. Later on, my mother got diabetes. We went to the doctor, and then I did some research on the Internet. I did not realize how serious having diabetes would be. You have to adjust what you eat and what you do. It made sense my mom had diabetes, because my other family members had similar history. I was worried I would be next, so I took care of my health. I care about my mother. It is very important to know your family history, so you can prepare for yourself and your family.”

Next scene:
Grey background with TraciAnn slightly on the right. Infographics appear on the left with blue letters: HINTS-ASL Survey Question #7:
White letters: Have any of your
Blue letters: family
White letters: members ever
Blue letters: had cancer?
10 rows of person icons appear, with 6 ½ rows blue, and 3 ½ rows white.

TraciAnn: “66% deaf people have family history of cancer. This is similar to the general hearing population. Cherish your family, your history.”

As TraciAnn is signing, the same family tree infographic appears on the left, with a blue heart on a person.

Next scene:
Maleni stands in front of green trees wearing a grey jacket.
“Don’t be afraid to ask for support.”

Next scene:
Hayden stands in front of a water fountain with Remy.
“Keep the deaf community healthy and strong!”

Next scene:
Sajiran stands in an aisle of books.
“Share, explain and ask. Honestly, it can save your life.”

Next scene:
TraciAnn with a grey background.
“Knowledge is healthy. Seek, share, and connect.”

Fades in black.

Next scene:
Dr. Poorna Kushalnagar is wearing a light blue shirt with a lab coat, sitting in her office.
“I would like to thank the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for supporting this project. The funds helped support travel to different states to recruit participants. For those who participated in this project, you are important. Thank you.”

A white font appears on the top left as Dr. Kushalnagar is signing, with a NIH logo: Research reported in this film was supported by the National Institutes of Health under grant number 7R15DC01481602 awarded to Poorna Kushalnagar, Ph.D.

Fades in black.

Grey background with white letters: DEAF HEALTH: SEEK, SHARE & CONNECT.

The logo appears and fades.

Acknowledgments:
Producer: Poorna Kushalnagar, Ph.D.
Director: TraciAnn Hoglind, B.A.
Student Videographer/Editor: Dimitri Foreman
Film Consultant: Stacy Lawrence, M.A.
Project Consultant: Georgia Robins Sadler, BSN, MBA, Ph.D.

Community Member Narrators:
Maleni Chaitoo
Sajiran Nadarajah
Hayden Shock & Remy (service dog)

Student interpreters:
Lena Jenny, female voice
Jeremy Miller, male voice

Volunteer:
Chris Khanoyan

References:
Kushalnagar, P. & Kushalnagar, R. (forthcoming) Health-Related Information Seeking among Deaf Adults: Findings from the 2017 Health Information National Trends Survey in American Sign Language (HINTS-ASL). e-Health: Current Evidence, Promises, Perils, and Future Directions.

Kushalnagar, P., Ryan, C., Smith, S., & Kushalnagar, R. (in press). Critical Health Literacy in American Deaf College Students. Health Promotion International. Doi: 10.1093/heapro/dax022.
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