HPV and the Deaf Community
Video Transcript

"[Black background with white letters: HPV & THE DEAF COMMUNITY.

On the upper center, there is a black, blue and orange circled logo with three people lined up. White letters after the logo says: DEAF HEALTH COMMUNICATION and QUALITY OF LIFE CENTER. This logo will be moved and remain there on the very bottom left for the whole video.

On the bottom center with white letters: Film produced by: Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center
On the bottom center, there is a gold logo. Blue letters under the logo say: Gallaudet University

Next scene:
On the bottom left, there is a black, blue and orange circled logo with three people lined up. A female Caucasian female nurse in blue nurse attire is shown working with a young olive-skinned girl with brown hair who is a patient in a room at a doctor’s office with a fatherly olive-skinned, middle-aged man with brown hair looking after his daughter and a female Caucasian interpreter with short brown hair interpreting to the girl.

Nurse: Good, and can you hold it there for me?
Thank you.

Nurse: Okay, great. So, I'll go tell the doctor now, and she'll be in soon.

Patient: Okay, sounds great!

Next scene:
On the bottom left, there is a black, blue and orange circled logo with three people lined up. A female Caucasian doctor with long strawberry-blonde hair in a white lab coat is shown entering the room along with the interpreter, meeting the patient and her father.

Doctor: Hi! I'm Dr. Spellun.

So how are you doing today?

Patient: I'm great, actually, but my dad won't stop talking about me being a baby.
I feel like, 'Come on!'

Doctor: I hate to say it, but you're gonna be his baby forever.
So I was looking at your records, and it looks like you're actually due for one more vaccine.
You've had the flu vaccine, the Tdap vaccine, the hepatitis vaccine, and the varicella vaccine, but you're still due for the HPV vaccine.

Interpreter: Dad's saying...

Dad: Excuse me, HPV? Can you tell us more about that? What exactly does that prevent?

Doctor: So, HPV stands for human papilloma virus, and this is a virus that can be transmitted sexually and can cause different types of genital warts as well as cancer, but the vaccine can actually prevent the transmission of that virus.

Dad: Uhh... umm... Doctor. You are talking about sexual activity. My daughter's far too young for that. She's only 11 years old. Why would you need to give her a shot right now?

Doctor: Lots of parents have the same question. It's actually important for kids to get the vaccine before they're even sexually active. That way, the body can build up an immunity to the HPV virus so that they're protected when they do get exposed later.

Dad: Did you understand what the doctor's saying?

Interpreter: And the patient's saying...

Patient: No.

Interpreter: Dad's saying...

Dad: So basically, the doctor wants you to get this vaccination now for a disease called human papilloma virus, or HPV. Right, and so, my concern is that obviously you're not making out with anyone. You're far too young for any of that kind of activity, so don't worry about it.

Next scene:
On the bottom left, there is a black, blue and orange circled logo with three people lined up. A white male narrator with brown hair in a blue shirt appears.

Narrator: This father's concerns are completely understandable and not uncommon among parents of young children. However, it's crucial that children be vaccinated early on, between the ages of 11 and 12, so that their bodies have time to develop an immunity against HPV. If children are not vaccinated ahead of time, they may be susceptible to HPV when they later become sexually active. For this reason, early vaccination is key.

Doctor: Any other questions?

Patient: I do, actually, I have a question. So, I just looked at that paper, and it said something about causing cancer? Like, how does that work?

Doctor: Another great question. So, the way that HPV can cause cancer is, it can go into different cells that are at the surface of the mouth, or the vagina, or the anus, and can cause those cells to grow and multiply and divide very quickly, and sort of take over, and that's what cancer is.

And there are actually 30,000 new cases of cancer caused by HPV every year. But the vaccine can prevent 90% of those cancers.

Next scene:
On the bottom left, there is a black, blue and orange circled logo with three people lined up. The narrator appears again.

Narrator: You've just seen this patient and her parent discussing the HPV vaccine with their doctor. Now watch as this next Deaf man shares his communication experience with his doctor regarding the HPV vaccine.

Next scene:
On the bottom left, there is a black, blue and orange circled logo with three people lined up and white letters: Emmanuel Perrodin-Njoku, Lab Intern. A black young man using glasses in a dark gray shirt appears in a white room.

Emmanuel: To date, I've taken various health-related classes and worked in a lab setting for two public health internships, the second of which I'm completing now.

We see the term HPV coming up frequently, and HPV vaccination is something I've recently been becoming more aware of. For a long time, I had thought the HPV vaccine was only for young women. But it turns out that young men also need to be vaccinated. So being a young man myself, this applied to me. Wondering if I had ever received the HPV vaccine in the past, I decided to check my medical records online,
and sure enough, I had been vaccinated back in 2013 when I was 16 years old. This was surprising, though, since I couldn't remember any of the details surrounding the vaccine. Looking back, I wish that my doctor had checked in with me and made sure I had understood what
the HPV vaccine meant for me and my health. And for myself, I wish I had been more assertive and asked more questions until I fully understood. HPV awareness is vital. Be sure to talk with your doctor about any questions you may have.

Black background with white letters: HPV KNOWLEDGE IS IMPORTANT. TALK WITH YOUR DOCTOR.

Next scene:
On the bottom left, there is a black, blue and orange circled logo with three people lined up. The narrator appears again.

Narrator: HPV awareness is vital. Be sure to talk with your doctor about any questions you may have.

Black background with white letters: Healthcare providers can explain how: - HPV can cause cancer; - HPV is passed between partners; - HPV vaccines can help.

Next scene:
On the bottom left, there is a black, blue and orange circled logo with three people lined up.

An Indian woman with black hair is wearing a light blue shirt with a lab coat seated in her office.

Dr. Kushalnagar: I would like to thank the National Institutes of Health for their support in funding this project.

On the upper right corner, National Institutes of Health’s logo and white text appear: Research reported in this film was supported by the National Institutes of Health under grant number 7R15DC01481602 awarded to Poorna Kushalnagar, Ph.D.

Acknowledgments:
Producer: Poorna Kushalnagar, Ph.D.
Screenwriter: Gideon Firl
Editor: Dimitri Foreman
Production assistant: TraciAnn Hoglind, B.A.
Film Consultant: Stacy Lawrence, M.A.

Cinematographers:
Gideon Firl
Dimitri Foreman

Community Member Narrators:
Arielle Spellun, M.D., as doctor
Jackie Emmart as interpreter
Joe Toledo as father
Belinda Toledo as daughter

Narrators:
Andrew Biskupiak, Lab staff
Emmanuel Perrodin-Njoku, Lab intern

Student interpreters:
Shane Carrizales, research assistant/captioner
Jeremy Miller, graduate student interpreter/voiceover/captioner

On the center, there is a black, blue and orange circled logo with three people lined up. White letters after the logo says: DEAF HEALTH COMMUNICATION and QUALITY OF LIFE CENTER.]
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