Coproduction, Coeducation, and Patient Involvement: Everyone Included Framework for Medical Education Across Age Groups and Cultures

Summary (Abstract)

Medical education, research, and health care practice continue to grow with minimal coproduction guidance. We suggest the Commons Principle approach to medical education as modeled by Ostrom and Williamson, where we share how adapting these models to multiple settings can enhance empathy, increase psychological safety, and provide robust just-in-time learning tools for practice. We here describe patient and public coproduction in diverse areas within health care using the commons philosophy across populations, cultures, and generations with learning examples across age groups and cultures. We further explore descriptive, mixed methods participatory action in medical and research education. We adopt an “Everyone Included” perspective and sought to identify its use in continuing medical education, citizen science, marginalized groups, publishing, and student internships.

Overall, we outline coproduction at the point of need, as we report on strategies that improved engagement. This work demonstrates coproduction with the public across multiple settings and cultures, showing that even with minimal resources and experience, this partnership can improve medical education and care.

 

Author(s)

Price, A., Damaraju, A., Kushalnagar, P., Brunoe, S., Srivastava, U., Debidda, M., Chu, L.

Publication Date

2021

Journal

JMIR Medical Education

Volume

7

Issue

4

DOI

10.2196/31846
Video Transcript
Medicine, research, education and health care services continue to grow (expand) with minimal coproduction guidance. We suggest the Commons (Standard) Principle approach to medical education as modeled by Ostrom and Williamson, Commons philosophy” implies where everyone is trusted and respected for the expertise they bring, where openness and experimentation is the norm, people have personal ownership of health, individual stories have a global impact, and the patient voice and choice is a part of all stakeholder decisions where we share how adapting these models to multiple settings can enhance (emphasize) empathy, increase psychological safety, and provide (practice tools, easy access) robust just-in-time learning tools for practice . We here describe patient and public coproduction in diverse areas within health care using the common philosophy across populations, cultures, and generations with learning examples across age groups and cultures. We further explore narrative, mixed methods and participatory action in medical and research education. We adopt an “Everyone Included” perspective and sought to identify its use in continuing (how it is applied in) medical education, citizen science (community members), marginalized groups, publishing, and student internships. Importance of Include story in medical and research education and how it can improve co-productivity Overall, This work demonstrates coproduction with the public across multiple settings and cultures, showing that even with minimal resources and experience, this partnership can improve medical education and care.