Deaf Patient-Provider Communication and Lung Cancer Screening: Health Information National Trends Survey in American Sign Language (HINTS-ASL)

Summary (Abstract)

Objective
To assess whether mode of communication and patient centered communication (PCC) with physicians were associated with the likelihood of deaf smokers inquiring about lung cancer screening.

Methods
An accessible health survey including questions about PCC, modes of communication, smoking status and lung cancer screening was administered in American Sign Language (HINTS-ASL) to a nationwide sample of deaf adults from February to August 2017. Of 703 deaf adults who answered the lung screening question, 188 were 55–80 years old.

Results
The odds ratio of asking about a lung cancer screening test was higher for people with lung disease or used ASL (directly or through an interpreter) to communicate with their physicians. PCC was not associated with asking about a lung cancer screening test.

Conclusion
Current or former smokers who are deaf and use ASL are at greater risk for poorer health outcomes if they do not have accessible communication with their physicians.

Video Transcript

Author(s)

Kushalnagar, P., Engelman, A., & Sadler, G.

Publication Date

2018

Journal

Patient Education and Counseling

Volume

101

Issue

7

DOI

10.1016/j.pec.2018.03.003